Accounting salaries stagnate, KPMG is on 'The Bachelor,' Plaid buys Quovo, TaxJar raises $60M for sales tax automation, why the virtual office doesn’t work for CPAs, and more

Accounting salaries stagnate, KPMG is on 'The Bachelor,' Plaid buys Quovo, TaxJar raises $60M for sales tax automation, why the virtual office doesn’t work for CPAs, and more

Blake and David dig into the lack of growth in accounting salaries despite the tight job market, KPMG’s representative contestant on this season of “The Bachelor,” Plaid’s acquisition of Quovo, TaxJar’s $60 million round of fundraising, Craig Smalley’s argument against virtual offices for accountants, where Americans moved in 2018, how the California Board of Accountancy just started (finally) accepting credit cards, and how some small businesses are no longer accepting cash.

What the government shutdown means for accountants, why perks no longer cut it for workers, and how 2019 is going to be the year of instant payments

What the government shutdown means for accountants, why perks no longer cut it for workers, and how 2019 is going to be the year of instant payments

The federal government may be shut down but the Cloud Accounting Podcast continues! Blake and David are back in 2019 with an episode all about what the shutdown means for tax season, employment verification, getting news from the IRS, and more. Also, learn why perks such as foosball tables no longer cut it for workers and why David thinks 2019 will be the year of instant payments.

2019 Predictions! Also, Isaac Asimov predicted the computer automation revolution, Mindbody to be sold, senators prod regulators on FinTech, and what’s new in QBO

2019 Predictions! Also, Isaac Asimov predicted the computer automation revolution, Mindbody to be sold, senators prod regulators on FinTech, and what’s new in QBO

Blake and David discuss all the trends continuing into 2019, their own predictions for the new year, what Isaac Asimov got right about the world in 2019 (it’s creepy how accurate he was), news about apps Mindbody and Robinhood, some cool new automation features in QuickBooks Online, and how Millennials and Gen Z are driving major shifts in customer expectations.

KPMG to fine staff for late time sheets, Square wants to be a bank, real-time payroll for workers, Flux raises 7.5M, and the case for a 6-hour workday

KPMG to fine staff for late time sheets, Square wants to be a bank, real-time payroll for workers, Flux raises 7.5M, and the case for a 6-hour workday

Despite bumper payouts to partners, the UK branch of KPMG announced it will be imposing penalties of £100 on staff who turn in their time sheets late. Meanwhile, the leader of the Labour party is calling the Big Four a “cartel” and is threatening to break them up. Meanwhile in the US, Square has revived its request to start a bank, which would primarily offer loans, deposit accounts, and prepaid cards to small businesses. Blake and David also discuss a couple of apps: 1) Earnin raised $125M to enable same-day payrolls for workers, and 2) Flux raised $7.5 in the UK to bring digital receipts to bank feeds via POS systems. Finally, Blake shares why it’s time to consider a 6-hour workday for knowledge workers.

David’s takedown of accounting social media “influencers,” Scaling New Heights adds Xero, Right Networks acquires Propelware, Plaid raises $250M, Expensify gets personal, & more

David’s takedown of accounting social media “influencers,” Scaling New Heights adds Xero, Right Networks acquires Propelware, Plaid raises $250M, Expensify gets personal, & more

David is tired of “social media influencers” who have no real experience acting as experts on social media, pumping the latest product or app that writes them a check. The gang also chats about Joe Woodard’s announcement on Twitter that Scaling New Heights Online will now include Xero as a sponsor. Other stories discussed: Right Networks acquires Propelware, Fintech startup Plaid raises $250 million at a $2.65 billion valuation, Intuit is (once again) relaunching the ProAdvisor program, Expensify releases a $5 per month personal plan. Finally, Blake shares Ryan Lazanis’ predictions for accounting firm trends through 2022 based on the World Economic Forum 2018 “Future of Jobs” report.

KPMG and Deloitte are going after your small business clients, Danny DeVito is your new QuickBooks coach, and how automation could worsen the digital divide

KPMG and Deloitte are going after your small business clients, Danny DeVito is  your new QuickBooks coach, and how automation could worsen the digital divide

Intuit’s Small Business Online Ecosystem Revenue increases 42 percent in its latest quarterly results; takeaways from QuickBooks Connect from Matt Paff and Sholto Macpherson; a new survey shows that 38 percent of employees resent when IT dictates the tech they use at work; crazy stats from the 2018 High Growth Study of professional services firms by Hinge Marketing; why blockchain won’t put accountants out of work anytime soon; and multi-factor authentication headaches

The time has come for cloud ERP, where top US banks are betting on FinTech, America needs more accountants in Congress, and more

The time has come for cloud ERP, where top US banks are betting on FinTech, America needs more accountants in Congress, and more

Blake and David share news and stories about the era of cloud ERP, blockchain, banking investments in FinTech, multi-factor authentication, why America needs more accountants in Congress, whether or not the Big Four have los their advantage in audit technology, and the growth of remote work among the professional class.

What Intuit’s quarterly results say about its battle against Xero, how high growth accounting firms are eating the world, why blockchain won’t eliminate accounting, and more

What Intuit’s quarterly results say about its battle against Xero, how high growth accounting firms are eating the world, why blockchain won’t eliminate accounting, and more

Intuit’s Small Business Online Ecosystem Revenue increases 42 percent in its latest quarterly results; takeaways from QuickBooks Connect from Matt Paff and Sholto Macpherson; a new survey shows that 38 percent of employees resent when IT dictates the tech they use at work; crazy stats from the 2018 High Growth Study of professional services firms by Hinge Marketing; why blockchain won’t put accountants out of work anytime soon; and multi-factor authentication headaches

Takeaways from the AICPA Controllers Conference, what’s new at Xerocon London, and how AI is catching expense report fraud

Takeaways from the AICPA Controllers Conference, what’s new at Xerocon London, and how AI is catching expense report fraud

Blake chats with Amy Vetter at the AICPA Controllers Conference about how modern modern accounting departments are refocusing to become proactive service centers as opposed to reactive cost centers; David shares news about Xero from Xerocon London, including Xero’s half year results; Gusto releases simple time tracking; ACH continues to grow; and how AI is helping companies reduce rampant employee fraud on expense reports using automation.

Accountants feeling challenged to adapt to new tech, Intuit’s plans to win the mid-market, and Sage Group’s new CEO is no big surprise

Accountants feeling challenged to adapt to new tech, Intuit’s plans to win the mid-market, and Sage Group’s new CEO is no big surprise

Blake and David are back from QuickBooks Connect and ready to catch up on the news, including the results from two surveys of accounting firms published recently in Accounting Today. The gist: Accountants in public are feeling plenty of pressure to keep up with technology changes and figure out how to differentiate themselves from the competition. Also, Intuit’s incoming CEO Sasan Goodarzi has come out swinging, telling the Silicon Valley Business Journal that he thinks QuickBooks has a huge opportunity to win the mid-market from Sage Intacct and Oracle NetSuite with their new QuickBooks Online Advanced. Meanwhile, Sage has chosen CFO Steve Hare to become their new CEO rather than choosing an outsider with “SaaS in their veins,” as had was expected.